Biblio-files for October & November 2014
Reading list October, 2014

Biblio-files for October & November 2014

Reading list October, 2014
Reading list October, 2014

I have to admit that since I have stopped buying books from Goodwill, the quality of what I am reading has drastically increased. I like to have a good selection to choose from, so there are still plenty remaining that are probably not what I would pick out if my options had not been limited, so excuse those peppered within each month for the next few months.

October Books:

1. Righteous Porkchop by Nicolette Han Niman. I need to start off with this book, as I have been talking about it non stop for almost 3 months now. I should begin by stating that it didn’t register when I picked this book up (I must not have read the back) at Barnes & Noble that it was authored by the wife of Bill Niman, founder of Niman Ranch. It made the book that much more wonderful though, as I lived and ran restaurants in the Hudson Valley of NY for a few years and was very familiar with the high quality of both their meat and philosophy.  If you have an interest in food quality and eating well, this book is extremely educational on the subject of industrial farming and food production in the US. I know farmers and have spoken to them at length about the battle in this country to make a living at farming while maintaining humane conditions for their animals. This book gets into it. It also brought light to the reality of chickens eating chickens and what that means to the humans who consume them. I loved this book.

2. Families and other nonreturnable gifts by Claire LaZebnik. Admittedly, I could’t remember much of this one. I have read at least two of her other books though and although none of them really stand out in my memory, they’re good reads. I think I wanted something lighter after reading accounts of animal slaughter. It was perfect for that.

3. Big Stone Gap by Adriana Trigiani. I have read a few of Trigianis books and they all have taken place in past decades. She does well with it, and what stands out the most to me are how she describes how the women look at that time. This book is set in the seventies, although the story could be told presently with updated icons and details. Reading this was like watching a movie, I could see it all as it happened. A bit fluffy, but not too bad.

4. Nantucket Nights by Elin Hilderbrand. Left over from the goodwill selection. Would never have picked this one up otherwise. A bit too soap opera ish…lots of drama that was a bit ridiculous. Maybe a good beach read.

Reading list November, 2014
Reading list November, 2014

November Books:

1. Man made by Joel Stein. Hilarious. Metrosexual guy has a son and feels unqualified to teach him to be a man, so he attempts to learn what it means to be one. I laughed the entire time. Its the perfect social commentary on how many men gen x and younger feel. Did I mention it was funny?

2. All The Flowers in Shanghai by Duncan Jepson. About a the life of a Chinese woman in old Shanghi. Beautifully written and engaging. An excellent historic story. Poetry in book form, which I normally do not go for but loved it in this instance.

3. The Painted Bird by Jerzy Kosinski. I have read many books written about the Holocaust, but somehow never had read this one. I’m glad I did as it is from a perspective I had not read before. The afterward of what happened post publication was almost as incredible as the book itself. If you have not had a chance, I highly recommend you read this one.

4. The Playdate by Louise Miller. Fluffy with twists and turns, you end it with a big WTF happened at the end. By no means ChickLit but still light enough for a plane or beach. Good book to curl up on the couch with a blanket and cocoa on a wintery day. It was an excellent decision after the least book to lighten the mood.

5. Good Grief by Lolly Winston. I was feeling it for the woman in this book, a young widow who tries to rebuild her life. Not a good one to read in public if you’re empathetic to main characters as you may cry a lot, but really touching.

Sooooo, what have YOU been reading? Would love to know!

 

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